Ecommerce Schema for Product Pages: Boost CTR & Conversions

Ecommerce Schema

You want the stars. You want the dollars. You want your products shown in all their colors. 

If you want to jazz up your product pages and outshine all your competitors in Google Search, you need ecommerce schema! 

The schema markup (AKA structured data) is a piece of code that provides Google and other search engines with key information about your products and pages in a format they can interpret and process with absolute certainty. 

In return, Google can add extra visual features to your search snippets – stars, ratings, and price – and even list your product directly on the search results page. 

In a competitive ecommerce environment, where every site wants maximum visibility, rich snippets will help your products stand out or at least level the playing field. 

In this article, I’ll give you all the tools and information to get started with ecommerce schema – what it is, why you want it, how to enable it for your website, and get all those search clicks you’ve been missing out on. 

Let’s get to it:

Sell more products with less effort.

If you want a steady flow of engaged customers primed to buy, we’ve got a proven process for driving organic traffic and converting it into sales.

Ecommerce Schema in 30 Seconds

As part of its continually improved process of showing us better search results, Google develops new search engine results page (SERP) features to help searchers navigate the results page quicker and get the information they need. 

For ecommerce searches, Google can augment snippets with features like:

  • Stars and ratings
  • Prices
  • Product images
  • Shipping cost and delivery estimates
  • Availability
  • Return policy information
  • And others

To enable any of these for your site, you need to provide Google with the correct information in the form of structured data or schema. 

Before we continue, let’s get these definitions out of the way:

  • Schema, schema markup, markup, and structured data are effectively the same term for the purpose of this article.
  • Similarly, rich snippets, rich features, and rich results are the same visual treatment in Google Search. 

All good?

Here’s an example: I searched for “toddler 14-inch bike”:

rich snippet 14 inch toddler bike
Daughter’s turning three

The rich snippets for Amazon and Guardian Bikes offer much more information than a standard text-only snippet. 

By placing the information right on the SERP, Google makes it easy for shoppers to identify which sellers fit their buying criteria.

But I actually had to scroll twice to get that screenshot. 

Merchant Listing Experiences

This is what I actually saw when I typed in my keyword:

merchant listing 14 inch toddler bike
Too much of a boy’s blue..

Immediately below the ads, a list of products is displayed on the search results page. 

Clicking one opens the product knowledge panel to provide more information about the product. Shoppers can choose the seller they like and go directly to their product page to learn more and make a purchase. 

If you click on any of the search categories in the left sidebar and top bar, Google modifies your search term and displays multiple merchant listing sections, effectively burying the organic results.

If you’re browsing the image results, Google can augment images with similar rich features and give searchers a shorter path to getting the product they like.

rich image result 14 inch toddler bike
Color ✔ Front basket ✔ White tires ✔

AND, they show up on mobile search, too:

merchant listings mobile mountain bikes
merchant listings mobile women spring dress

These search features are collectively called “Merchant Listing Experiences.” They’re an expanded version of ecommerce schema that allows you to define specific product data, have your products shown directly on Google’s search results page, AND get the normal visual enhancements in the organic search section.

Merchant Listing Experiences are available on every website that:

  • Is the final seller – people can buy the products directly from the site
  • Uses the correct structured data 

For websites that don’t sell products directly, you’re still eligible to use structured data to enhance your organic search snippets.

Why You Should Care About Product Structured Data

The benefits of ecommerce schema become clear when you need to scroll multiple times to reach the first organic search result

For product search terms, your site loses a ton of visibility if it doesn’t participate in the merchant listing experience. 

Even comparing organic results only, rich snippets improve click-through rates significantly over non-rich results. They can also improve conversion rates for visitors who land on the website, as they come in better informed and self-quality before clicking. 

Here’s an example. I searched for “Makita Circular Saw HS7600”:

rich results makita circular saw
The latest addition to my zombie survival woodworking toolkit

When somebody searches for the full brand and product name, they’re at the end of their buying journey. They’ve watched the videos, read the comparisons, and made their decision. The only question they have now is:

Where to buy it from?

  • Ironically, Makita’s own website appears twice, but both snippets look dry compared to the competition. Though, in all honesty, you can’t buy from the Makita website directly. They’re not D2C
  • Despite being in second place, Home Depot dominates the SERP visually. They’ve got all the features – reviews, price, delivery, return policy, and availability. 
  • Amazon also has some rich features, but not as rich.

Even without looking at the numbers, you can intuitively understand why searchers are drawn to the results that have rich features more than the results that don’t.

But don’t trust me, here are the actual numbers, as reported by Google:

  • Rotten Tomatoes added structured data to 100,000 unique pages and measured a 25% higher click-through rate for pages enhanced with structured data than those without.
  • The Food Network has converted 80% of their pages to enable search features, and has seen a 35% increase in visits.
  • Rakuten has found that users spend 1.5x more time on pages that implemented structured data than on non-structured data pages, and have a 3.6x higher interaction rate on AMP pages with search features vs. non-feature AMP pages.
  • Nestlé has measured pages that show as rich results in search have an 82% higher click through rate than non-rich result pages.
Google

Without structured data, you compromise all benefits of your ecommerce SEO campaigns.

Classic Ecommerce Schema vs. Merchant Listings

Here’s the performance of an ecommerce website broken down by search appearance (rich snippets):

GSC search appearance

Here are the numbers in a format we can work with:

Search AppearanceClicks% of Total ClicksImpressions% of Total ImpressionsAverage CTRAverage Position
Review snippet121,19845.99%4,477,35741.16%2.71%19.08
Product snippets35,09613.32%2,786,36825.61%1.26%26.95
Merchant listings4,5051.71%9,5170.09%47.34%7.31
Recipe gallery4,0541.54%117,3361.08%3.46%9.66
Translated results990.04%7,6440.07%1.30%12.38
Total263,526100%10,879,031100%2.40%16.5

Around 2/3rds of all search impressions have some type of rich features. The vast majority of those are reviews and product snippets. These are the bread and butter of ecommerce schema. 

Only a small portion includes merchant listings. However, look at the click-through rate! 47.34%. That’s nearly 20x higher than the average CTR for the whole site! 

The average CTR for position #7 in Google Search is only 3.0%, and even the 1st organic result gets 39.8%.

Merchant Listings Experiences can drive highly motivated buyers at the end of their purchase journey.

So how do you get all of these for your ecommerce website? 

Stick with me. 

Working with Product Schema Markup on Your Website

To get these rich snippets in search you need to create a piece of code and place it on your product page. That’s the schema markup and it instructs Google what data to place in each of the features. 

Wanna see schema? Meet my friend JSON.

Jason Statham
In my next movie, I kick computer boy butt all around Europe.

No, not this Jason… this JSON-LD: 

<script type="application/ld+json">
{
	"@context": "http://schema.org/",
	"@type": "Product",
	"name": "Rank Improvement Stone",
	"image": "https://digitalcommerce.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/Rank-improvement-stone1.png",
	"description": "The Rank Improvement Stone increases Google rankings by up to 47%. Rub gently while chanting every morning to activate. If you see no improvement after the first month, use the stone to smash your computer and offer the remains to the Google God. Repeat until you see positive results.",
	"gtin14": "1845678901001",
	"brand": {
		"@type": "Brand",
		"name": "Digital Commerce Partners"
	},
	"offers": {
		"@type": "Offer",
		"priceCurrency": "USD",
		"price": "199",
		"url": "https://digitalcommercepartners.com/rank-improvement-stone/",
		"itemCondition": "https://schema.org/UsedCondition"
	},
	"aggregateRating": {
		"@type": "AggregateRating",
		"ratingValue" : "4.8",
		"ratingCount" : "356",
		"reviewCount" : "451",
		"worstRating" : "1",
		"bestRating" : "5"
	},
	"review": [
		{
			"@type": "Review",
			"name" : "Game Changer for SEO!",
			"author": {
				"@type": "Person",
				"name": "Aleks Stoyanov"
			},
			"datePublished": "2024-04-01",
			"reviewBody" : "The Rank Improvement Stone has absolutely transformed how I optimize websites. Nowadays, I just rub and chant for 1 hour each day, and all my clients' websites experience constant growth month after month. Occasionally, I have to smash my computer and make an offering, but it’s worth it. Try it for yourself!",
			"reviewRating": {
				"@type": "Rating",
				"ratingValue" : "5",
				"worstRating" : "1",
				"bestRating" : "5"
			}
		}
	]
}
</script>
Friday Movie Damn Scene

Looks scary, right? I’ll break it down for you in a minute.

JSON-LD is the preferred method when manually working with structured data, as it allows you to keep the schema markup separate from the HTML. It’s just a standalone <script> tag that you add to your page – simple and easy to change when needed. 

Other methods exist, like RDFa and Microdata, but you don’t need to worry about them…yet.

For now, don’t worry about the code at all! 

You won’t need to write any code yourself. You’ll use one of the many schema markup generators available. For the example above, I used this tool: https://webcode.tools/structured-data-generator/

Warning: Most free structured data generators are limited and cannot provide all possible schema configurations. Some also suffer from coding errors, which can invalidate the entire code. So, use free generators with caution.

Product Schema Generator
The interface of https://webcode.tools/structured-data-generator/

Look at the interface on the left. ALL schema is just a simple collection of attributes and values formatted in a specific way so that Google recognizes it (and other search engines)

Now look at the code on the right. When you get past the programmy-looking formatting, it’s not any different.

How do you know if your schema markup is correct? Fortunately, Google gives us an invaluable tool to check and verify structured data – the Rich Results Tester

You can inspect a live URL and detect what structured data is added to the page, what rich snippets are generated by Google, whether they’re correct or not, and get a preview of your rich snippet in search.

You can also inspect a piece of code, as I did:

Rich Results Test

When you iron out all the details, the final step is to add the code to your page. Preferably, the schema should go in the <head> tag, but you can also place it in the <body>

The exact location doesn’t matter. It won’t appear visually on your page; it’s for Google’s eyes only (and other search engines, competitors, and SEO nerds like us). 

Common Types of Ecommerce Schema Markups

Google Search Central lays out everything you need to know about structured data in ecommerce. You’ll find all the documentation and guidelines necessary to understand what structured data is used where, and how to enable it for your website. 

This is your go-to resource when working with schema of any kind.

Here are the ecommerce schemas you need to know about.

  • Product schema: Arguably the most important for ecommerce, this is used to add structured data about your products and enables most of the rich results and merchant listings we’ve discussed so far.
  • Review schema: Also very important for ecommerce pages. The review schema allows you to mark up individual reviews and average ratings to display in search results. Reviews build trust, which is essential for keeping your click-through and conversion rates high.
  • WebSite schema: Used to enable the site links and search box features directly in the SERP, allowing users to quickly navigate to the correct page.
  • Breadcrumb schema: Enables breadcrumb features, allowing searchers to navigate your website structure more effectively.
  • VideoObject schema: Used to markup video to enable video features in search. 
  • LocalBusiness schema: Provides Google with structured data about your brick-and-mortar locations. If you own physical stores or businesses, it’s best to register with Google My Business, where you’ll get extensive options to provide data in a more user-friendly interface. 

You can use any of these schema types and even all of them together. Google doesn’t penalize you for using more schema (than you probably need), so long as it’s correctly structured and follows their guidelines. 

Keep in mind: 

Just because you’re using schema markup on your website doesn’t guarantee Google will display ALL rich features for ALL your pages ALL the time. What you see in search still is and forever will be at the discretion of the almighty algorithm. 

Almighty algorithm
We pray to You Almighty, for the ranks we want to gain and the ranks we want to take away from our enemies..

Google can and will penalize you if you use structured data that’s misleading, spammy in nature, or takes advantage of loopholes for some perceived SEO gain. 

Using the Product Schema for Ecommerce Websites

As stated earlier, product schema is the most important structured data for ecommerce websites. 

It allows you to provide data about your products, including:

  • Name
  • Description
  • Brand
  • URL
  • Ratings
  • Reviews
  • Product image
  • Price
  • Shipping and delivery 
  • Availability 
  • Condition
  • Returns policy
  • GTIN or other unique identifiers
  • And more, the full documentation is available at Google Search Central.

For your product schema to be valid, these attributes are required:

  • Name
  • Review OR aggregateRating OR offers – either is sufficient, but all are recommended for enabling more rich features on your snippet.

This is the simplest product schema that will still validate in the Rich Results Tester.

We’re using just the name and the aggregateRating attributes. 

<script type="application/ld+json">
{
	"@context": "http://schema.org/",
	"@type": "Product",
	"name": "SEO Competition Blocker",
	"aggregateRating": {
		"@type": "AggregateRating",
		"ratingValue" : "4.3",
		"ratingCount" : "17",
		"reviewCount" : "",
		"worstRating" : "1",
		"bestRating" : "5"
	}
}
</script>

I recommend at least adding the offers attribute, as it allows you to input a lot of product-specific information.

The bare minimum to validate offers is to add the price attribute, like so:

"offers": {
		"@type": "Offer",
		"price": "499"
	}

We can go a few steps further and define the priceCurrency, url, and itemCondition

"offers": {
		"@type": "Offer",
		"priceCurrency": "USD",
		"price": "499",
		"url": "https://digitalcommercepartners.com/seo-competition-blocker/",
		"itemCondition": "https://schema.org/NewCondition"
	}

Prices are easy when you have a simple price per item. It starts to get tricky when your price is defined for a unit of volume or weight. 

Here’s an example: Seven Sons sells Whole Lamb – 8 Way Cut at $18.10 per pound. The average quantity is 41.78 lb. This would come out to an average cart price of $756.22 per lamb. 

If we evaluate the product URL in Rich Results Tester, we’re greeted with a glaring error. 

Seven Sons Price Schema Error

The price attribute only accepts a numerical value! 

If you want to define a price per unit of weight, you have to nest the price and priceCurrency attributes within a priceSpecification, where:

  • referenceQuantity defines the amount you purchase – in this case ~42lb per lamb
  • valueReference defines the base amount for which the price is applied – 1lb for $18.10

Here’s the correct JSON:

"priceSpecification": {
          "@type": "UnitPriceSpecification",
          "price": 18.10,
          "priceCurrency": "USD",
          "referenceQuantity": {
            "@type": "QuantitativeValue",
            "value": "42",
            "unitCode": "LB",
            "valueReference": {
              "@type": "QuantitativeValue",
              "value": "1",
              "unitCode": "LB"
            }
          }
        }
Jason Momoa
I am the correct Jason!

Jason, go, please…don’t distract them..

Merchant Listings

We’re getting there! Let’s turn it up a notch and start working with the Merchant listing markup. This is nothing more than an extended version of the product schema that you see above. 

In fact, if you scan the code in the Rich Results Tester, it will tell you exactly what you need to get your product placed directly in the SERPs.

Merchant Listing Rich Result Tester

All we’re missing to qualify is the image markup. That’s easy, just one attribute nested under the product schema.

But if you got this far, you should also add the recommended markup as shown:

 "image": "https://digitalcommerce.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/competition-blocker.jpg"

availability is easy. Just one line, nested under offers.

"availability": "https://schema.org/InStock"

hasMerchantReturnPolicy is a little bit more complex, it requires more attributes to describe fully:

  • applicableCountry, which defines the country where returns are available
  • returnPolicyCategory, which defines what the return policy actually is (return in a set time frame, no return, unlimited return). 

It’s nested under offers. This example defines a 30-day return policy in the U.S. Returned products are mailed back free of charge.

"hasMerchantReturnPolicy": {
          "@type": "MerchantReturnPolicy",
          "applicableCountry": "US",
          "returnPolicyCategory": "https://schema.org/MerchantReturnFiniteReturnWindow",
          "merchantReturnDays": 30,
          "returnMethod": "https://schema.org/ReturnByMail",
          "returnFees": "https://schema.org/FreeReturn"
}

shippingDetails is one of the most complicated markups, as shipping prices can depend on many factors. It has several attributes all nested under the offers markup.

"shippingDetails": {
          "@type": "OfferShippingDetails",
          "shippingRate": {
            "@type": "MonetaryAmount",
            "value": 4.99,
            "currency": "USD"
          },
          "shippingDestination": {
            "@type": "DefinedRegion",
            "addressCountry": "US"
          },
          "deliveryTime": {
            "@type": "ShippingDeliveryTime",
            "handlingTime": {
              "@type": "QuantitativeValue",
              "minValue": 0,
              "maxValue": 1,
              "unitCode": "DAY"
            },
            "transitTime": {
              "@type": "QuantitativeValue",
              "minValue": 1,
              "maxValue": 3,
              "unitCode": "DAY"
            }
          }
        }

Finally, to make sure your product page is eligible for merchant listing experiences, you need to provide an acceptable unique product identifier:

  • brand and product name are the minimum acceptable product identifiers.
  • gtin (OR gtin8 OR gtin12 OR gtin13 OR gtin14): Global Trade Item Number – otherwise known as a barcode, available on every product label.
  • mpn: Manufacturer Part Number – a unique number issued by the manufacturer, also available on every product label.
  • isbn: International Standard Book Number – only applicable to books. 

SKU is not a valid product identifier, as it’s not consistent across different merchants. It’s only unique to your inventory system. 

And here’s the final JSON:

<script type="application/ld+json">
{
	"@context": "http://schema.org/",
	"@type": "Product",
	"name": "SEO Competition Blocker",
    "brand":"Digital Commerce Partners",
    "description":"The SEO Competition Blocker effectively removes your top 3 competitors from the search engine results page. Requires a daily offering to the Google God to maintain effectiveness.",
     "image": "https://digitalcommerce.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/competition-blocker.jpg",
     "gtin14":"1845678901001",
	"aggregateRating": {
		"@type": "AggregateRating",
		"ratingValue" : "4.3",
		"ratingCount" : "17",
		"reviewCount" : "",
		"worstRating" : "1",
		"bestRating" : "5"
	},
  	"offers": {
		"@type": "Offer",
		"priceSpecification": {
          "@type": "UnitPriceSpecification",
          "price": 18.10,
          "priceCurrency": "USD",
          "referenceQuantity": {
            "@type": "QuantitativeValue",
            "value": "42",
            "unitCode": "LB",
            "valueReference": {
              "@type": "QuantitativeValue",
              "value": "1",
              "unitCode": "LB"
            }
          }
        },
		"url": "https://digitalcommercepartners.com/seo-competition-blocker/",
		"itemCondition": "https://schema.org/NewCondition",
        "availability": "https://schema.org/InStock",
        "shippingDetails": {
          "@type": "OfferShippingDetails",
          "shippingRate": {
            "@type": "MonetaryAmount",
            "value": 4.99,
            "currency": "USD"
          },
          "shippingDestination": {
            "@type": "DefinedRegion",
            "addressCountry": "US"
          },
          "deliveryTime": {
            "@type": "ShippingDeliveryTime",
            "handlingTime": {
              "@type": "QuantitativeValue",
              "minValue": 0,
              "maxValue": 1,
              "unitCode": "DAY"
            },
            "transitTime": {
              "@type": "QuantitativeValue",
              "minValue": 1,
              "maxValue": 3,
              "unitCode": "DAY"
            }
          }
        },
        "hasMerchantReturnPolicy": {
          "@type": "MerchantReturnPolicy",
          "applicableCountry": "US",
          "returnPolicyCategory": "https://schema.org/MerchantReturnFiniteReturnWindow",
          "merchantReturnDays": 30,
          "returnMethod": "https://schema.org/ReturnByMail",
          "returnFees": "https://schema.org/FreeReturn"
         }
	}
}
</script>

Reviews and Rating Schema

The reviews schema allows you to markup your reviews and overall rating to display in rich snippets. In fact, Google displays reviews and ratings as the first (sometimes the only) rich feature.

Cordless stick vacuum product schema
I don’t know how I ever lived without one of these.. Never going back.

Positive reviews and high ratings build trust and confidence like nothing else. But don’t trust me, trust OptinMonster:

  • Over 99.9% of customers read reviews when they shop online. 96% of customers specifically look for negative reviews.
  • 49% of consumers trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations from friends and family.
OptinMonster

You must ensure your reviews are always visible and easy to find. And it doesn’t get easier than putting them directly in the SERP. 

Two types of review schema apply to ecommerce websites: 

aggregateRating: Defines the average rating of the product based on all your reviews. It’s nested as part of the product schema.

Check it in Rich Results Tester.

<script type="application/ld+json">
{
	"@context": "http://schema.org/",
	"@type": "Product",
	"name": "Rank Improvement Stone",
	"image": "https://digitalcommerce.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/Rank-improvement-stone1.png",
	"brand": {
		"@type": "Brand",
		"name": "Digital Commerce Partners"
	},
	"aggregateRating": {
		"@type": "AggregateRating",
		"ratingValue" : "4.8",
		"ratingCount" : "356",
		"reviewCount" : "451",
		"worstRating" : "1",
		"bestRating" : "5"
	}
}

Then, there’s the review attribute, which defines a single user review with an author, rating, and a body of text. You can add as many individual reviews in the schema as there are on the page. 

Both review and aggregateRating are nested inside the product markup, so you can and should stack them together with other product-related attributes.

Check it in Rich Results Tester.

<script type="application/ld+json">
{
	"@context": "http://schema.org/",
	"@type": "Product",
	"name": "Rank Improvement Stone",
	"image": "https://digitalcommerce.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/Rank-improvement-stone1.png",
	"brand": {
		"@type": "Brand",
		"name": "Digital Commerce Partners"
	},
    "review": [
            {
                "@type": "Review",
                "name" : "Game Changer for SEO!",
                "author": {
                    "@type": "Person",
                    "name": "Aleks Stoyanov"
                },
                "datePublished": "2024-04-01",
                "reviewBody" : "The Rank Improvement Stone has absolutely transformed how I optimize websites. Nowadays, I just rub and chant for 1 hour every day and all my clients' websites experience constant growth month after month. Occasionally, I have to smash my computer and make an offering, but that's a price well paid. You have to try it for yourself!",
                "reviewRating": {
                    "@type": "Rating",
                    "ratingValue" : "5",
                    "worstRating" : "1",
                    "bestRating" : "5"
                }
            }
        ]
}
</script>

Implementing Schema Markup on Your Ecommerce Site

Okay, now you know all about the important schema types, but how to actually get them working on your site? 

If you have a small ecommerce site with 10 – 20 pages, it’s acceptable to manually create the JSON code as shown above and add it to every page. This approach gives you the maximum flexibility to tailor your schema perfectly to your products. 

However, it’s pretty technical work, prone to error, and it’s on you to maintain the markup over time and update it as your products change.

If you have a larger store, it’s simply not feasible to do it manually. In that case, you have to explore the capabilities of your content management system and look for native or 3rd party features to automate schema for your pages. 

Before You Worry About Google Product Schema

Jason Friday The 13th
You have to worry about me!

Stop it, Jason! They’re scared enough as it is…

Before you worry about structured data, make sure your website is healthy and running properly:

  • Is your website live, crawlable and indexed in Google Search?
    • Is your robots.txt file in order? Don’t block search engines from crawling your website.
    • Are your meta robots tags in check? Index,follow or don’t bother with schema.
    • Are your sitemaps in order? Make sure your content is always accessible to search engines.
    • Do you have proper canonicals? Take care of duplicate content.
  • Is your product page SEO set up? Headings, product descriptions, images, videos, keywords, URLs, load speed, UX. First, make sure your page appears in search before you worry about search appearance.
  • Do you have Google Search Console set up? No? Stop everything and go do it. GSC is an invaluable tool for every webmaster. You want it verified and collecting data the moment your website goes live. Aside from the priceless search performance data, GSC will also show you specific reports for product snippets and merchant listings. 
GSC Structured Data Performance

Ecommerce Schema for WordPress Stores

If you’re running a WordPress store, there’s an ocean of possibilities.

Many themes have native features for adding schema to different content types. But you probably already have a running site and a theme you don’t want (or need) to change. 

Then, you’ll be delighted to know that WooCommerce – the most prominent WordPress ecommerce plugin – has native features for adding schema to products. That said, WooCommerce can sometimes lag behind schema developments in Google. 

Even then, ALL major SEO plugins like RankMath, Yoast SEO, All in One SEO have features for adding schema to your pages. If you have neither of these, you probably have bigger problems than structured data. 

Finally, there are standalone plugins for adding schema markup to your site, like:

Explore the WordPress plugin directory and find the best solution for your particular website.

WordPress Schema Plugins

As with every WordPress site, the fewer plugins the better. Explore all native and existing solutions first, then move on to a dedicated structured data plugin.

Don’t cheap out! Most times, free alternatives will lack the full range of ecommerce schema capabilities. It may be enough for your store, but if not, just make the right investment. 

Ecommerce Schema for Shopify Stores

If you have an existing Shopify store, you most likely already have some kind of structured data enabled. Most modern Shopify themes have built-in schema functionality. 

Not all are born equal, so the best place to start is your Google Search Console to get an overview of how your site is performing in terms of structured data. Then, scan individual product pages with the Rich Results Tester and check if everything is correct. 

If you find that your Shopify site lacks structure data, or it’s incomplete or missing the attributes you need, you can install one of the many SEO apps from the app store. 

Some of the more prominent are:

If you don’t have reviews on your product pages, fix that ASAP. Pretty much all review apps will come with a built-in review schema, so your testimonials and ratings will get marked up properly right out of the box. 

Some popular ones are:

Here’s a more in-depth video on schema for Shopify:

Also, I recommend Ilana Devis’s site who shares a ton of valuable information about working with structured data on your Shopify store.

Ecommerce Schema for Magento Stores

Magento (now Adobe Commerce Cloud) is another popular platform for ecommerce stores. 

Newer iterations of Magento – versions 2.X – come with built-in functionality for Product, Review, AggregateRating, and Offer Schema. However, these have a limited amount of attributes available. 

In fact, you get limited control over many SEO parameters – meta robots, canonicals, etc. 

So, if you don’t already have one, it’s best to invest in a good SEO extension that also provides structured data. 

Here are some that have good all-around capability:

Ecommerce Schema for Squarespace Stores

This one is easy, here’s the info straight from the man himself:

“Structured data helps Google understand and classify pages and their content. Squarespace automatically generates structured data using these schemas:

  • Blog post
  • Event
  • Local business
  • Organization
  • Product
  • Website

It’s not possible to edit or remove this data.”

Squarespace

Check your site with Rich Results Tester and GSC. If you’re having problems, contact Squarespace Support. 

Alternatively, you can manually add structured data in JSON format using the code widget. You can do this for every page of your site, including products. However, you become responsible for monitoring and maintaining its accuracy over time. 

Google Merchant Center

You can also add structured data feeds through Google Merchant Center. If you’re running paid ads in Google anyway, it’s a good idea to integrate this platform into your workflow and explore its capabilities.

Google Merchant Center is not in the scope of this article, but this video is a good introduction if you’re interested:

Google Tag Manager

There’s one final option that works independently from your CMS type or access level. 

If your website has Google Tag Manager installed and verified, you can inject pretty much any type of content and code through the tool. 

You can generate dynamic schema markups that pull variables from the content like price, availability, ratings, etc, and update as your products do. 

This option goes into developer territory – it involves actual programming, and there’s real potential to do a lot of harm if you don’t know what you’re doing.

Need Help with Your Ecommerce Product Schema Markup?

All right, this ecommerce schema crash course is over. You should have a detailed understanding of how to create and apply product and review structured data for your ecommerce website.

Remember:

  • Google gives you the documentation
  • Google gives you the testing tool
  • Google gives you the monitoring platform

What’s left is to go out there and break some code. No, seriously, just copy some of the examples above into Rich Results Tester and try to adapt them to your products. 

Or let us break the code for you. At Digital Commerce Partners, we excel at breaking code and blaming developers for it.

I’m just kidding. 

If your ecommerce site lacks structured data, you’re missing out on visibility and clicks in search. There’s money on the table, and we can help you grab it. 

Contact us to learn more.

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